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Curry Goat by Chris King

Game recipes? I could give you another for a “dry” goat curry, but for this one you need to have a ½ - ¾ grown goat, and use the back steaks or the tender part of the back legs or it can become a little tough. If you do knock over older animals they’re still great to eat, but go better in crock pot / long simmer recipes.

Now sometimes it’s difficult to get good fresh herbs and spices from the supermarket, so best to shop where the Indians shop. There’s a chain of spice shops called Discount House which is scattered all through Auckland and out laying regions like Pukekohe, and they carry a lot of stock.

Please don’t think that you have to stick exactly to the recipe, it’s a guide, take out anything you don’t like, add anything that you do.

So, ingredients – 500 gm goat as mentioned above, take out any sinew, and cut into 1 inch cubes (2.5 cm for those of you who deal in metric).
 1 large onion roughly chopped.

3 or 4 cloves of garlic, roughly chopped – incidentally for anyone who doesn’t like the after taste (or day after smell / taste) of garlic try baking a whole bulb of it with the top of the bulb cut off, in the oven for about an hour at 180 C (wrap it in tin foil). That totally changes the flavour and makes it really mild. Use the pulp from the whole bulb in place of the 3 – 4 cloves.

Cube of fresh ginger, about 1 inch, finely chopped.

Fresh chilli, preferably deseeded, finely chopped, to taste – the small ones tend to be much hotter than the larger varieties. Wash your hands well after doing the chillies.  

½ teaspoon of whole cumin seeds.

Cup of stock – can use chicken stock, or make your own from the goat bones if you feel really keen.

Splash of brandy

Ground spices – best fresh ground - for adding just before serving:
½ inch of cinnamon .
¼ tea spoon of each cumin, cardamom, coriander seeds.
2 cloves.
5 – 6 peppercorns.

Cook onion, garlic, chilli, and ginger in a little oil until the onion and garlic just start to go clear. Take them from the pan and fry the meat with the whole cumin seeds until meat is brown and well sealed. Add the stock to deglaze the pan, put back the onions, etc. Simmer of ½ hour, then remove lid and let the stock boil down – keep it stirring and try not to let it burn! When stock has reduced to about half, add splash of brandy, season to taste (salt, or you could use a teaspoon of fish sauce) If you want to thicken it a bit you could add a dessert spoon of oyster sauce. Simmer for a further minute to flash off the alcohol, stir in ground spices, add fresh coriander for decoration and serve with rice.
Have fun out there, Chris.

 Goat Curry number 2

 500 grams goat meat                 2 large potatoes           2 large onions                                           2 tomatoes                                         1/4 tsp cinnamon            1 tsp curry (adjust to taste)                     2 tsp green herb stock                    2 tsp crushed garlic        2tsp crushed ginger                                1/4 cup soy sauce                            1/2 tsp salt                       oil                                       

Method

Clean the meat and dice into small pieces. Cut the potatoes into large pieces. Coarsely slice the onion and quarter the tomatoes.

In a heavy large pot, heat the oil.

Add only half the onions and sauté until the onions brown slightly.

Turn the heat down and add all the remaining spices  and the soy sauce. Fry for a few minutes.

Add the meat and fry for a further few minutes, mix the spices through the meat.

Cover with water. Bring to boil and then lower the heat to medium. Keep adding water if it starts to stick to the bottom of the pot. Lower the heat if needed. Cook for 15 minutes .

Add the tomatoes and potatoes and the remaining onions and cook for a further 20 minutes or until the meat is cooked.

Serve Goat Curry with rice.

Pot roast goat by Chris King
If you have a joint from a goat sitting in the freezer, and you're not sure how to cook it, try this - find a casserole, or oven proof bowl with a reasonably well fitting lid, (you can use tin foil as the lid) make sure that your defrosted joint fits in quite snugly.
 
Add a dessert spoon of oil (olive, avocado, rice oil) doesn't matter which as it's not going to be cooked on blast heat, a dessert spoon of soy sauce, then pack the free space in the casserole with a chopped apple (skinned and cored, there's nothing worse in my book than finding a "toe nail" from the apple core and wondering if it's a real one!). chopped onion, a chopped clove of garlic, and a finely chopped knob of ginger.
 
Finally - sorry Jill - sprinkle over a heaped teaspoon of sugar, put on the lid, which will hopefully still fit, or cover tightly with tin foil, and bake in the oven at 130 C. for a couple of hours. Time will obviously depend on how big the joint of meat is, but it should be almost falling apart when done.
 
Allow to stand for 15 min before serving, and use that time to thicken up the juices from the meat to make gravy, and serve with whatever veg you found lurking in the fridge.
 
Now if you've used the meat from a 15 year old billy goat to make this, better call in the fumigators to get rid of the smell, and warn the local council that there's some bio waste on the way, but if you've used the meat from a nanny or young animal you should, I hope, enjoy the result.
 
Oh yes, you could also use this for recipe for lamb if you happened to have any.

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